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Please find many of the research studies conducted around the world in relation to Scheuermann's Disease. Please note that the Copyright of these articles belongs to the Journals that published the material, Scheuermann's Disease Australia does not claim ownership of any information displayed on this page, it is being displayed purely for educational purposes.

Please find many of the research studies conducted around the world in relation to Scheuermann's Disease. Please note that the Copyright of these articles belongs to the Journals that published the material, Scheuermann's Disease Australia does not claim ownership of any information displayed on this page, it is being displayed purely for educational purposes.



Untreated Scheuermann’s disease: a 37-year follow-up study

"…Scheuermann’s patients had higher risk for back pain than controls. Patients had nearly fourfold higher risk for back pain during the past 30 days, and nearly threefold higher risk for continuing back pain than controls. Disabilities related to activities of daily living, such as carrying a 5-kg load at least 100 m and walking up one floor without resting, were more frequently reported by the Scheuermann’s patients compared to controls…"

Scheuermann's Kyphosis and Roundback Deformity (Results of Milwaukee Brace Treatment)

"…Review of 223 patients with Scheuermann's kyphosis and postural roundback showed that seventy-five patients with this deformity who had completed Milwaukee brace treatment had their kyphosis improved by an average of 40 per cent; their vertebral wedging, by an average of 41 per cent; and their lordosis, by an average of 36 per cent. Severity of kyphosis (greater than 65 degrees), skeletal maturity (as shown by iliac epiphysis closure), and vertebral wedging averaging more than 10 degrees were factors which limited the amount of correction obtained with the Milwaukee brace. The presence of scoliosis did not affect the end result…"

Review of rehabilitation and orthopedic conservative approach to sagittal plane diseases during growth: hyperkyphosis, junctional kyphosis, and Scheuermann disease

"…HK during growth remain quite a neglected area of research. Treatments aims at reducing esthetic impair- ments and pain during growth and, while allowing a proper sagittal development of the spine, aims also at reducing disturbances in adulthood like pain and pro- gressive flexion with time. Even if traditionally these approaches have been made mainly by orthopedic sur- geons, the treatment tools used for the so-called “con- servative management” (we prefer rehabilitation approach) are mainly in the Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine specialty domain, including braces and exercises…"


Scheuermann Kyphosis

"…Scheuermann disease was initially described as a rigid kyphosis associated with wedged
vertebral bodies occurring in late childhood. 37 The condition has been of significant
orthopedic interest since that time, both because the condition is sometimes painful during
its relative acute phase, and more importantly, because it causes significant truncal
deformity that may be progressive. Sorensen subsequently described specific criteria for
diagnosis in 1964, namely, that three adjacent vertebrae must be wedged at least 5 each…"

Development of spinal posture in a cohort of children from the age of 11 to 22 years

"…Spinal posture and the resultant changes during the entire pubertal growth period have not been reported previously. No cohort study has focused on the development of spinal posture during both the ascending and the descending phase of peak growth of the spine. The growth and development of a population-based cohort of 1060 children was followed up for a period of 11 years. The children were examined 5 times, at the ages of 11, 12, 13, 14 and 22 years. A total of 430 subjects participated in the final examination. Sagittal spinal profiles were determined using spinal pantography by the same physician throughout the study. Thoracic kyphosis was more prominent in males at all examinations. The increasing tendency towards thoracic kyphosis continued in men, but not in women. The degree of lumbar lordosis was constant during puberty and young adulthood. Women were more lordotic at all ages. Thoracic hyperkyphosis of ≥45° was as prevalent in boys as girls at 14 years, but significantly (P<0.0001) more prevalent in men (9.6%) than in women (0.9%) at 22 years. The degree of mean thoracic kyphosis and the prevalence of hyperkyphosis increased in men during the descending phase of peak growth of the spine, but decreased in women…"

The Mode of Inheritance of Scheuermann’s Disease

"…The mode of Scheuermann’s disease inheritance and its phenotypic traits in probands and their relatives were studied in 90 pedigrees (90 probands and 385 relatives). The disorder was identified as a genetically related pathology inherited by autosomal dominant type, controlled by a mutant major gene, as a kyphotic deformity without signs of vertebral bodies’ anomaly and torsion. Morphological and biochemical studies showed disturbance in the structure of vertebral growth plate anterior aspects at the level of deformity, defects in proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes, and change in proteoglycan spectrum in cells and matrix. Twelve candidate genes were studied in chondrocytes isolated from vertebral growth plates of patients with Scheuermann’s disease. The study results included disorder in the IHH gene expression and preservation of the expression of PAX1, two aggrecan isoforms, link protein, types I and II collagen, lumican, versican, growth hormone and growth factor receptor genes, and proliferation gene. Preservation of the SOX9 gene (transcription gene) probably indicates posttranscriptional genetic disorders. The study is under way…"

Scheuermann's Disease: The Lumbar Variant

"…Kyphosis dorsalis juvenilis was described by Holger Werfel Scheuermann in 1921 when he noted the development of painful fixed kyphosis in 105 children. Radiographs showed compression of the anterior vertebral borders, with a wedge deformity and irregular epiphyseal centers. Scheuermann thought it similar to the femoral head abnormality described by Calve and Perthes and named it osteochondritis deformans juvenilis dorsi. 1 This entity has gone by many names, but it is most frequently called Scheuermann's disease.."